Tag Archives: drugs

#TheSpoon

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spoon

“Guerilla Art” By Domenic Esposito, Fernando Luis Alvarez Gallery, Stamford CT

I save the bent and burnt spoons when I come upon them now. I never thought I would; but I do.

There was a point when I saw them and didn’t understand what was in front of me.

Then another point in time when I’d find them and burst into tears, much like I imagine Domenic Esposito’s mother must have done when she found yet another burnt spoon, throwing it in the garbage, quickly, like it was still scorching hot.

There aren’t many now, just two in the drawer, occasionally resurfacing from some mysterious hiding place. I let them swim freely in the utensil drawer; those two broken reminders of darker days, surprising me, reemerging without warning.

Domenic listened to his panic-stricken mother’s cries, his brothers tool of destruction found bent and burnt. He honored her and every mother who ever cried out in pain when they found yet another spoon or perhaps couldn’t find any, and for every person lost to heroin; the consequence of phenomenal greed and the heartlessness, when he created a ten and half-foot long, 800-pound steel tribute, in the shape of a spoon, and delivered it to the doorstep of Purdue, the golden egg of the Sacklers. The hundreds of thousands of dead, not enough of a reason for the Sacklers to come under the scrutiny of our criminal justice system, though blocking the driveway of the offices where this plague was born and refusing to move Domenic’s “guerilla art” is a felony.

I imagine this beautiful, painful piece of art is made of all of the spoons found by mothers like me, bent and burnt, tears and steel, melted together and calling out for justice for our children from its’ place on Purdue’s driveway.

They can’t relate, the Sacklers, their spoons are made of gold… and blood.

I save the bent and burnt spoons to remind me of where I have been although I can’t forget and to remain grateful for how far I have come, but also because they symbolize my vow to never forget that I have been spared to fight for justice for those no longer here, unable to fight for themselves.

Thank you Domenic Esposito and Fernando Luis Alvarez.

Strength in numbers!

Heroin rears it’s ugly head in suburbia

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Dear Friends,

The experience of writing this blog has proven to me that as different as we all may think we are we are all remarkably similar as well. The problems and concerns that hit me in Boston are also having the same effect on someone across the world. Records gathered from police, courts and the medical examiner shatter stereotypes about who gets sucked into this deadly vortex. It’s not all young adults. The median age of overdose victims is 41. And they’re not the dregs of society. They are homemakers, professionals, students and laborers. (Patriot Ledger) . One person every 8 days dies of a heroin/opiate overdose in my area and the numbers keep rising. I am impressed and encouraged by the actions of a small Massachusetts town Police Chief. I encourage you all to share/reblog this story with the hope that the approach will catch on. There may only be small things that anyone can do but sometimes the small ripples create the huge wave of change. Thank you.

https://www.facebook.com/GloucesterPoliceDepartment?fref=nf or http://gloucesterpd.com/blog

Gloucester Police Department (Official)
May 4 at 10:55am · Edited ·
PLEASE READ THIS POST:
On Saturday, May 2, the City held a forum regarding the opiate crisis, and on how Gloucester has many resources for help. We are poised to make revolutionary changes in the way we treat this DISEASE. Your Police Department vowed to take the following measures to assist, beginning June 1, 2015:
– Any addict who walks into the police station with the remainder of their drug equipment (needles, etc) or drugs and asks for help will NOT be charged. Instead we will walk them through the system toward detox and recovery. We will assign them an “angel” who will be their guide through the process. Not in hours or days, but on the spot. Addison Gilbert and Lahey Clinic have committed to helping fast track people that walk into the police department so that they can be assessed quickly and the proper care can be administered quickly.
– Nasal Narcan has just been made available at local pharmacies without a prescription. The police department has entered into an agreement with Conleys and is working on one with CVS that will allow anyone access to the drug at little to no cost regardless of their insurance. The police department will pay the cost of nasal narcan for those without insurance. We will pay for it with money seized from drug dealers during investigations. We will save lives with the money from the pockets of those who would take them. We recognize that nasal narcan is not the answer, but it is saving lives and no one in this City will be denied a life saving drug for this disease just because of a lack of insurance. Conleys has also agreed to assist with insurance requests from those who do not have any.
– I will personally travel to Washington DC, with the support of Mayor Theken, the City Council, Sen. Bruce Tarr, and Rep. Ann-Margaret Ferrante, on May 12 and 13. There I will meet with Senators Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey and Congressman Seth Moulton. I will bring what Gloucester is accomplishing and challenge them to change, at the federal level, how we receive aid, support and assistance. I will bring the idea of how far Gloucester is willing to go to fight this disease and will ask them to hold federal agencies, insurance companies and big business accountable for building a support system that can eradicate opiate addiction and provide long term, sustainable support to reduce recidivism.
I am asking for your help. Like this post, send it to everyone you can think of and ask them to do the same. Speak your comments. Create strength in numbers. I will bring it with me to show how many voters are concerned about this issue. Lives are literally at stake. I have been on both sides of this issue, having spent 7 years as a plainclothes narcotics detective. I have arrested or charged many addicts and dealers. I’ve never arrested a tobacco addict, nor have I ever seen one turned down for help when they develop lung cancer, whether or not they have insurance. The reasons for the difference in care between a tobacco addict and an opiate addict is stigma and money. Petty reasons to lose a life.
Please help us make permanent change here in Gloucester.
Thank you,
Chief Campanello